Maker Faire

Zigbee Revealed

Type: Maker Table/Exhibit
Program Area: Electronics

Day/Time: Saturday and Sunday

Location: To be determined

Zigbee is a developing standard (805.15.4) for home automation and personal wireless networks. Experience Zigbee first-hand with demonstrations of a Zigbee developer kit. Run through a typical device life-cycle sequence, and see the results in a Zigbee packet sniffer.

Presented by

Jeff Williams

I am one of three founders of Gadgetworks, LLC, a small, innovative company based in the San Francisco area. I have spent the better part of my career working in manufacturing and logistics technology, and have had the privilege to travel the world doing it. For almost ten years I was a senior developer/programmer at a company in Oakland, CA that provides the world's leading container shipping and port management systems. I left in 2001 to form Gadgetworks with two partners. One of our early products is in use at some of the world's biggest retailers. My professional expertise is the development of mobile information systems. Until last year I only wrote software, that is, until I discovered the joy of making 802.15.4 wireless devices. Now I spend 80% of my time writing software, and 20% wrestling hardware. My current work engages J2EE, wireless networking protocols, and teeny-tiny programs that have to live in less that 60 bytes of stack. I am one of three founders of Gadgetworks, LLC, a small, innovative company based in the San Francisco area. I have spent the better part of my career working in manufacturing and logistics technology, and have had the privilege to travel the world doing it. For almost ten years I was a senior developer/programmer at a company in Oakland, CA that provides the world's leading container shipping and port management systems. I left in 2001 to form Gadgetworks with two partners. One of our early products is in use at some of the world's biggest retailers. My professional expertise is the development of mobile information systems. Until last year I only wrote software, that is, until I discovered the joy of making 802.15.4 wireless devices. Now I spend 80% of my time writing software, and 20% wrestling hardware. My current work engages J2EE, wireless networking protocols, and teeny-tiny programs that have to live in less that 60 bytes of stack.